Four Very Rare Westley Richards Magazine Rifles

Just arrived at the U.S. Agency are four outstanding Westley Richards bolt action magazine rifles featuring very rare options and configurations offered by Westley’s prior to World War II. Rarely do rifles like these come to market but to have such a variety, in such high, original condition is remarkable.

This represents only a good opportunity to boost up a rifle collection, it offers a chance to see rifles from both the pre-war and between-the-wars eras with special options usually only seen mentioned in the company’s past catalogs.

Westley Richards & Co. .318 Accelerated Express “Light Model” Magazine Rifle #LT39452 completed in 1913

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Some Interesting Westley Richards ephemera, curios and other relics.

An original, unopened package of Westley Richards .450 No. 1 Carbine for the Deeley-Edge Model 1869 Carbine. Among his seminal developments such as the doll’s head extension, Westley Richards, the founder’s eldest son, was instrumental in the development of the solid drawn brass case.  While metal cases were not a new concept, the Westley Richards patent number 1572 of 1871 introduced a longer, stronger brass case capable of handling higher velocities. This had lasting effects on both military and sporting arms. This is some of the first ammunition to be loaded with such cases. With 55 grains of blackpowder, it shoots a 380gr paper patched soft lead bullet at 1,300 fps.

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Westley Richards ‘Gun Archive’ – The Magazine Rifle

As so this week we come to the magazine rifles and yet another week in isolation. As you all probably know, Westley Richards has been building magazine rifles for as long as suitable actions were available. Single shot rifles were the order of the day until reliable repeating rifle actions became available able to handle ‘modern’ smokeless powders.

Naturally Paul Mausers action of 1898 remains the firm favourite amongst British classic rifle manufacturers and over the years we have used all manner of variants from original Oberndorf ‘Sporters’ to Military ’98’s to the modern production actions coming out of the USA and Germany.

Whilst fixed barrel rifles have always been a given, the ‘detachable barrel’ or take-down configuration has become a firm favourite within the Westley Richards armoury. Over the years we have been lucky enough to build our rifles in most of the popular big game calibres as well as our own proprietary ones, the .318 and .425. The detachable barrel version making for an elegant and practical travelling rifle.

Anyway, we hope you enjoy the selection below and wish you once again a safe week ahead.

 That most classic of calibres the European 9.3 x 62 built to our ‘Modele de Luxe’ standard in a detachable barrel configuration. This rifle once again displayed a variety of engraving techniques with a beautifully carved ‘Maral’ stag on the floor plate.

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Fine Handmade Knives at the Westley Richards Agency

With gunmaking at its core, the Westley Richards firm has a long history of dealing in secondhand guns and rifles of all makes and models. We continue that tradition today handling some of the World’s finest firearms. However, our interest does not end at just fine guns but also includes any other items built for purpose with flawless function but also beautiful in shape, fit and finish.

I believe anyone who appreciates the guns, rifles and fine leather goods produced at Westley Richards will also see the beauty in these handmade knives I came across in my most recent travels.

Treeman 5” Trout & Bird and Treeman 6” Skagel Pattern Hunter

Jim Behring/Treeman – A longtime outdoorsman Jim Behring of Michigan is best known for his Skagel inspired knife making style. Known as “Treeman” knives, a name from a previous career cutting trees, his knives are highly regarded among collectors and hardcore outdoorsman alike.

Jim hammer forges 35 to 55 knives per month and while he is a very prolific maker, his knives are relatively rare to find on the secondhand market and certain era knives and configurations are rising in price year over year.

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Westley Richards ‘The Explora’ Journal – In From The Printers!!!!

Hot off the press and looking magnificent is The Explora journal by Westley Richards. This last week we received the first 10 copies for approval and we all have to say that it surpasses even our demanding standards!

Having taken 2 1/2 years to bring to fruition it was with great excitement, trepidation and relief that we got to handle the first copies fresh in from the printers. This project was a true labor of love for the team here at Westley Richards, so it was finally great to see the fruits of all that hard work.

The front cover features Westley Richards stunning and as yet unseen ‘Forest Rifle’, a magnificent .600 droplock double rifle specially commissioned to reflect the Central African forest environment. Fully carved in exceptional detail with the flora and fauna of the forest floor, the story of this rifle unfolds in the stunning photography The Explora fans have come to expect from Westley Richards.

Other articles, specially commissioned, focus on engraving, gunmaking, historical weapons, shooting and gun fit, topics we hope will be close to the heart of many an avid sporting man and woman.

Presented in a beautifully-designed luxury format with a combination of high quality uncoated and gloss coated paper stock and an outer cover finished with a scratch resistant matt lamination with spot gloss varnish and gold foil embossed logo. The 180-page journal, epitomises the exceptional standards and painstaking attention to detail synonymous with Westley Richards.

With a limited print run of only 1000 copies, never to be re-printed, The Explora journal is set to become a collectors item that no self respecting Westley Richards afficiando should be without.

The first copies to clients will be coming out in the next few weeks so for those of you yet to place your order now is the time!!!!!

To order your copy of The Explora journal click here

Or

Telephone:  UK 0121 333 1900   USA +1 850 677 3688

Email: retail@westleyrichards.co.uk

 

 

 

A Small Westley Richards Find

Every now and then one of those nice little finds gets passed our way here at Westley Richards. And so it is that this 10 round .22 rimfire stock magazine came our way recently and has been added to the archive here at the factory.

Discovered in the back of an old shop as literally ‘dead stock’ it must have been there from before the First World War and once again highlights that you never know what might be lurking, tucked away in some dark corner. One day I hope to find that elusive Westley Richards howdah pistol, complete with case and accessories in pristine unfired condition…………..

Pair of Westley Richards 16g Holster Pistols

I am just returning from a trip in which I visited one of America’s oldest and most historic cities. A fitting place to find this pair of cased Westley Richards 16g Percussion Holster Pistols made in the first half of the 19th Century.

Originally ordered for stock, this pair of pistols was shipped, in their ‘box”, on May 16, 1839 to the London Agency at 170 New Bond St. Now, 180 years later, these pistols are being offered for sale by this firm. Only this time, at Westley Richards’ U.S. Agency.

A “boxed” or cased set of pistols like this were a sign of status and they were finished to a very high standard. The locks, hammers, trigger guards and breach blocks are decorated with a traditional acanthus scroll engraving and the maker’s name is engraved on each lock plate.

The small sized, bar action hammer locks have flat plates and are fitted with flat faced serpentine hammers with stylized dolphin heads and back sliding safeties.

Each pistol has 8” twist octagon barrels that are engraved with the maker’s name on the top flats. They have V-notch rear sights on the breach irons and small brass beads at the muzzles. The barrels are fitted with bridled steel ramrods that still operate flawlessly.

Lightly figured European walnut stocks have “bag” shaped grips and forends that extend to within 5/8” of the muzzle. The stocks have very nice flat top checkering, are iron mounted and have rectangular crest plates engraved with a “rising eagle”.

Overall the pair’s condition is excellent and the guns remain completely original. The locks and hammers display strong amounts of their color hardening and most of the original brown is left on the barrels that have excellent bores. The stocks are also sound, crack free and in superb original shape retaining almost all their original oil finish. The forearm wedges and triggers still show a vivid charcoal blue and almost all the original black remains on the trigger bows.

The pistols are paired in the original mahogany case that is also in very nice original condition still retaining the original trade label and well preserved green baize.

This pair of pistols is another great example of the high-quality arms Westley Richards has produced and sold for over two hundred years.

The Perfect African Accompaniment

The debate of what rifle, in what calibre, is the best for hunting in Africa is a discussion as old as the sport itself and I don’t intend to delve into or attempt to answer such a lengthy and hotly contested question in this blog. But what I want to share with the readers, is a rifle, that has recently come through our doors, which I believe quite comfortably covers with ease, a wide range of African game and safaris and has a serious chance of answering the aforementioned question for me.

Ray Ward Gunmakers, based in Knightsbridge London, have been a high end gun retailer for a number of years and in more recent times have become a gunmaker in their own right. One such rifle to have been built by the London makers is this superbly versatile take down bolt action rifle, two barrel set in .375 H&H Magnum and .416 Remington Magnum. Completed around 2001, the rifle is built on a standard length Obendorf action with two interchangeable, screw threaded barrels using the Jeffery style screw in peg to secure them in place. The .416 barrel measures 23 3/8” with a ramp foresight and single standing express sight. While the .375 barrel is 22” with the same open sight configuration with the addition of a flip over foresight hood. The Zeiss Conquest DL 1.2-5×36 scope is mounted on H&H QD mounts and the rifle weighs 10lbs 1.7oz in .375 and 10lbs 7oz in .416.

The pistol grip stock is beautifully figured and measures 14 1/8” to the centre of the Silver’s recoil pad with a cheekpiece, grip cap, gold oval, sling stud, two recoil bars and horn forend tip. Expertly engraved by David Tallett with a bold scroll coverage, the case colour floor plate is engraved in gold with the calibres and FOR BIG GAME. The scope rings are also gold inlaid with the calibres and makers name.

The rifle is finished to a very high standard, is well balanced and points with ease. The action is smooth, the barrels are tight on the action and the bores are both in mint condition. It is neatly presented in its leather case with a sling, turnscrew, cleaning rods and accessories.

The .375 has proven its worth time and time again and shouldn’t need me argue its case. The .416 Remington since its introduction in 1988 has gained the affection of hunters world wide, non more so than legendary PH, Robin Hurt. Firing a 400 grain bullet with a muzzle velocity of 2400 fps, it is capable of taking Africa’s largest game and compliments the .375 perfectly. It’s an attractive and beautifully made African all-rounder that you’d be hard pressed to find a hunt it didn’t suit.

Pair of Westley Richards Percussion Belt Pistols

A rarity for sure, our latest find is this truly outstanding pair of Westley Richards, double barrel, belt pistols, we believe completed somewhere around 1830. Although there is likely to be a serial number present if you were to strip the pistols, sadly there is no number on the external so we can’t trace the history exactly, but what I can tell you, and is plain to see from the images, they are in absolute first class condition and are a marvel of early 19thcentury craftsmanship by this firm.

Built with brown twist, sighted, 3 ¼” smooth bore barrels engraved ‘Westley Richards London’ with a stirrup ram rod and blued steel belt hook. Both pistols retain vivid case colours and are engraved with a foliate scroll coverage, high fences and dolphin head hammers with a slide back safety. Crisp, finely chequered handles with silver escutcheon and engraved grip cap with trap. Weighing 1lbs 14oz they point effortlessly and remain in unmolested condition, even the pins are clean, straight and untouched.

It’s safe to say we don’t get pistols in like this very often at all and the fact that they are made by our predecessors and remain in such fantastic condition is great to see. Sadly they are not cased but nevertheless, they are quite superb in every way.

Spicer’s Stalking Records – Westley Richards & Co.Ltd

An interesting find this last week was this ‘Spicer’s Stalking Records’ of 1914, detailing Red Stag trophies from the 1913 season. The reason we say interesting is that a close link existed between Westley Richards and the famed taxidermist Peter Spicer of Leamington Spa, which until now we have never seen published in anything other than Westley Richards ‘Centenary’ catalogue of 1912.

Peter Spicer was born in 1839 and died in 1935, aged 96. He was one of the pre-eminent taxidermists of the day and was renowned for the quality of his cased birds, fish and Red Stag mounts. His studio operated primarily from Leamington Spa with an offices based in Inverness, Scotland, that handled many of the trophies hunted in the north.

Peter Spicer 1839-1935

The opening page of ‘Spicer’s Stalking Records’ giving the two retail address’s used by Westley Richards at the time.

Individually ‘tipped in’ photos of some of the better stags shot during the 1913 season.

‘Spicer’s Stalking Records’ is a very nice publication that detailed many of the great deer forests, along with the best trophy Red Stags shot on those estates. Many of the better stags have tipped in images along with a short story about the trophy. The would unquestionably have been fierce competition amongst estates to produce the best trophies!

Westley Richards clearly had strong links with Peter Spicer and although no records exist today of how this relationship came about, it is probably safe to assume that it was of mutual benefit between the two great companies. If clients shot game with Westley Richards guns and rifles then clearly they needed a good taxidermist to prepare the varying trophies. It is worth remembering that Westley Richards also offered fishing rods, reels and accessories at the time and so all forms of taxidermy were a requirement for the sporting elite of the day.

Interestingly, Spicer’s Inverness office offered for sale Westley Richards guns and rifles, clearly acting as an agent in the north for the company, something we were until now unaware of.

The First World War would soon consume everyones attention and it would be somewhat sobering if time permitted, to see how many of the names listed in this 1914 Stalking Records actually survived the war.

An advert for Westley Richards Deer Stalking rifles.