Superb W. J. Jeffery 12g Sidelock Ejector

We are often tasked with finding a good quality English side by side ejector, in tidy condition, by our clients for the upcoming season. Something to use on smaller days when double guns are not required or as a more traditional alternative to the modern over and under, a gun they may shoot well with, but lacks the passion and character of a proper English side by side. Finding an English side by side is easy, I hear you say, but not, as our discerning clients would expect, in superb original condition, ready for the season.

The latest used gun to arrive at WR UK is exactly that. A superb W.J. Jeffery No. 3 Model, 12g sidelock ejector in, what can only be described as, first class condition. Completed around 1930, the gun is built on a 7 pin, square body, sidelock action beautifully engraved with two bouquets of roses on each lock plate, both fences, forend iron and a single large bouquet on the bottom of the action, all surrounded by a fine scroll coverage. The action retains nearly all its original case colours and the file up and shape is of real quality. The 28” barrels feature 2 1/2” chambers and are choked 1/4 in the right and 3/4 in the left. The bores read almost as proofed and the wall thickness is .025″ at the thinnest point.

The stock measures 14 5/8” to the centre of the leather covered recoil pad and has a bend of 1 1/2” at the comb and 2 1/8” at the heel. The cast measures 1/4” off at the heel and 3/8” at the toe. The splinter forend has the Anson push rod release, forend diamond and engraved tail pipe. Weighing 6lbs 7.4oz the gun comes to the shoulder with ease and is as delightful to handle as it is to look at. Cased in a lightweight, compact, leather case with a set of cleaning rods, snap caps and cleaning accessories. A very beautiful but perfectly usable sidelock for a variety of game shooting.

The trade label reads 9, Golden Square, Regent Street, London W1, which matches the engraving on the rib. William Jackman Jeffery died in 1909 and the company was taken over by his brother Charles. His nephew F. Jeffery Pearce took over the company in 1920 when Charles died and saw it through till 1957 when the company was sold to Malcolm Lyell who at that time, also owned the Westley Richards London agency and fishing tackle specialist, Farlows.

The No. 3 model sits between the No. 1 and No. 4 sidelocks that were offered by Jeffery’s at the time. Costing £52 for a single gun and £105 for a pair and came in 12, 16 or 20g.

While we would normally associate the name W.J. Jeffery more with rifles, their shotguns, and sidelocks in particular, were of superb quality and this gun would rightfully hold its own against the other London makers of the time.  To quote the Jeffery catalogue of the 1930’s:

The excellence of our Guns and Rifles is known all over the world, and we claim that for accuracy, soundness of workmanship, durability, and style of finish, goods of our manufacture are unequalled. We make every effort to keep the price of our weapons down to the lowest possible limit consistent with sound workmanship. We can confidently invite a comparison of our prices with any other firm doing the same class of business, feeling sure that this comparison will result in our favour”.

The gun will be on our used gun site shortly. Please contact me direct for any initial inquiries at ricky@westleyrichards.co.uk

 

New Westley Richards 20g ‘Ovundo’ Just Completed

Through the works and looking quite stunning this month is one of our Westley Richards 20 bore ‘Ovundo’ shotguns. As previously mentioned this gun is one of the original 13, a project that was originally commissioned in 2004. Even by modern gunmaking standards the renewed ‘Ovundo’ project has been a long affair!

Historically speaking, the first ‘Ovundo’ patents were registered in 1914 as the scramble among British gunmakers for something new and exciting in the world of guns, took Westley Richards, Boss, Woodward, Edwinson Green and others in the direction of the over and under shotgun. The concept itself of the over and under was not a particularly new one as British makers had been making over and under pistols and rifles since the flintlock era.

During the next two decades the Westley Richards over and under was driven to its own level of perfection with models based around the two key actions associated with the company, namely the ‘boxlock’ and ‘hand detachable lock’. Looking to the under hook barrel design for the rotation of the barrels on the action Westley Richards ‘ovundo’ was unquestionably a deep actioned gun compared to the Boss design of 1909. However the depth of the action allowed for the fitting of components based around the boxlock and hand detachable lock design and it has to be noted that making the ‘ovundo’ a hand detachable lock really took some doing. The gun really is a mechanical masterpiece.

Variants on these two actions included double and single triggers, non-ejector and ejector, scroll back, side plated and availability in both shotgun and rifle calibres as well as the ‘Faunetta’ and ‘Explora’ rifle choked formats. These variations make the ‘ovundo’ genuinely collectable as you never quite know what might turn up in the market.

Vivid case colour hardening adds impact to the bold etched scroll design. The gold lettering stands out crisply against the colours. The ‘ovundo’ features Westley Richards signature top lever shape and safety button.

Vintage Westley Richards promotional material showing the exact format of gun as built today. Whilst the ‘ovundo’ project has been a long one it highlights the level of skill required to build a gun that has unique features in the over and under market. 

The side opening ports on the dummy lock plates are a unique feature of the ‘Ovundo’. Simple maintenance of the single trigger was achieved through these ports, whilst also adding a little novelty to the design. Westley Richards has always had a knack of outdoing itself!!!!

The etched background to the elaborate ‘acanthus’ engraving design adds a sharpness to the engraved coverage.

  A beautiful green goat skin lined lightweight leather case complements this modern ‘ovundo’.

Some Great Vintage Holland’s At Westley Richards US Agency

Four very nice Holland & Holland shotguns have come into the Westley Richards U.S. Agency and are just going up on the secondhand gun site (https://www.wrusedguns.com/view/all-listings/). We have been fortunate to have some very fine Hollands this year and this new group of guns is no exception.

Holland’s is famous for many innovations in gun making, but none more so than the Royal model hammerless sidelock. While the Royal needs no introduction to most readers of this blog, this most recent group of guns features some of the more obscure models offered by the storied firm.

The first two guns are 12g and 20g Northwood models. After WWII, Holland & Holland offered a boxlock ejector that was made in the Birmingham trade then finished, shot and regulated by Holland’s in London. This gun was known as a Northwood.  Sometime in the 1980’s, Holland’s made moves to produce their own boxlock. The project lead to the company purchasing the venerable Birmingham gunmaker W. & C. Scott and offering two models, the new Cavalierand the Northwood, the latter being the less adorned of the two.

Both models were based on the proven Anson & Deeley fixed lock or “boxlock” action. Available in 12g and 20g and built on dedicated frame sizes with scroll backs and Scott’s spindle top lever. All the parts were made in Birmingham at the W&C Scott factory and the guns were stocked, engraved and finished in London at Holland’s factory. According to Donald Dallas’ book Holland & Holland, The Royal Gunmakers, Complete History (Quiller Press, 2003)the project ran about a decade ending sometime in the 1990’s and Holland’s only made about 200 of the very high-quality guns.

The two Northwood models here at the Agency have traditional scroll engraving, color case hardened finishes and 2 ¾” chambers with 1989 Birmingham proof marks. They are nicely stocked with straight hand grips, auto-safeties, two triggers, and rolled trigger bows. The 12g weighs just over 6 lbs. with 28” barrels and the 20g weighs just under 6 lbs. and is fitted with 27” barrels. Both of these guns are in superb condition and in their own lightweight canvas case.

The ‘Northwood’ Model

The ‘Riviera’ Model

Another gun in the group is a factory two-barrel set 12g called the Riviera Model. In Dallas’ book, he says the Riviera Model was offered for more than 30 years, from 1933 to 1967. Despite being available for over three decades, it is a rarely encountered model.

I have seen the Riviera model featured in Holland catalogs from before and after WWII and described as:

“…12 bore Hammerless Ejector Gun with two pairs of interchangeable 28 inch barrels, treble grip action, two triggers-front hinged, hand-detachable locks, selected French walnut, chambered for the 2 ¾-inch case, weight about 7 lbs. 4 oz. to 7 lbs. 6 oz…introduced particularly for sportsmen desirous of a using one gun only, for either game or trap shooting. One pair of barrels bored full choke, while the second pair throw more open patterns for game shooting”

The Riviera was built on a Badminton hammerless ejector sidelock action with Holland’s patent hand detachable locks and Treble Grip action that accepted their hidden third bite. Another obscure name from Holland’s, Badminton was used for a plainer sidelock that employed the same action as the Royal model but without the famous Royal pattern house engraving.  This was originally known as a No. 2 but donned a new name after WWI and named for Holland’s Badminton shooting school.

This Riviera was built in 1937 and ordered with very specific details by the customer. As specified on the factory build sheet, the first set of barrels are choked at .004” and .010” and listed on the build sheet as “field” barrels. The second set of barrels are choked .029” and .040” and described as “pigeon” barrels. Each set of barrels have original 2 ¾” chambers and the same wall thickness as specified on the factory build sheet (.024” in the field barrels and .026” in the pigeon barrels). The barrels are numbered, in gold, “1” and “2” respectively and also marked with the “98 New Bond St.” address and “Riviera” is engraved on each top rib.

The action of the Riviera model is engraved in a bold floral pattern with the Maker’s name on each lock plate in flowing banners with gold lined cocking indicators and fire blued pins, and the word “SAFE” inlaid in gold. On the bottom of the action it is engraved “Badminton Ejector”. The gun comes complete in its original two-barrel “VC” case.

Last and certainly not least, is a Holland & Holland 20g Royal Brevis. The ‘Royal Brevis’ Model

The word Brevis is Latin for “short” and is the name Holland’s uses for any Royal gun made with barrels shorter than 28”. Introduced in 1931, the Royal Brevis was conceived to keep up with the trend of shooting with shorter gun barrels made popular by Robert Churchill. Referring again to Mr. Dallas’ book, The Royal Brevis name was not used in any Holland catalogs after WWII, but he says it remained available. In my own experience, I have encountered many post-war Holland’s with barrels shorter than 28” but not marked Brevis; no doubt this is a very rare gun to find made in modern times.

I know barrels shorter than 28” are often frowned upon by some. But let’s be honest, most upland hunting in North America is for walked up birds that flush in different directions, with little to no warning, and often in tight cover. This type of shooting is simply better served by shorter barrels. While I fully understand the benefits to long barrels for pass shooting doves or high driven pheasants, the fact is so called “short” barrels are handier in tight cover and easier to change their direction when shooting birds who flush or fly erratically. Lightweight guns like this Brevis are fast handling and easy to carry making them tailored made for the kind of hunting we Americans enjoy.

Finished in 1992, this gun is made in the traditional Brevis configuration with 26 1⁄2″ barrels but specially ordered as a lightweight, weighing only 5 1⁄4 lbs. The gun has a an exceptionally dainty action body and beautifully struck lightweight barrels. The gun also employs all the same best quality features of the Royal such as hand detachable locks, Holland’s self-opening mechanism on the barrels and Royal engraving. This gun has a brushed or “coin” finish, gold lined cocking indicators, two triggers with the front one being articulated and a rolled trigger bow and the serial number and the word “SAFE” are inlayed in gold.

All in all, this group of guns offers a nice selection of Holland & Holland guns, all at different price points, and are more examples of why vintage Hollands remain so desirable.

For further information on any of these guns please contact:

‘LD’ E. Duke McCaa II

Telephone: 850 324 1150  Email: ld@westleyrichards.com

Composed Pair of Westley Richards 12g Lightweight Game Guns

As previously discussed on this blog, the Westley Richards lightweight game gun is a rarity. There are only a few pairs that we know of and only one or two single guns have come back to us in recent years. One could argue things that are rare, are rare for a good reason. They are not the ‘best’, the ‘most efficient’ or the deemed popular by the masses and hence not many were required. And this maybe true of the lightweight gun. If you plan on shooting 40 days a season at 70 yard towering pheasants with 36 gram No. 4 shot, these guns are definitely not for you. But there are places where these guns are not just capable, but are exactly the type of gun you need. This theory was confirmed to me on a recent trip to the grouse moors in the Yorkshire Dales. The grouse, a bird that definitely does not need any assistance in flying fast, were very kindly helped along by a 40mph tail wind, which made the already high speed bird almost supersonic. As horizontal rain hammered the side of my face and I was still a little dusty from the night before, it very quickly dawned on me that the 32″ barreled 8lbs 10oz gun I had chosen to bring, was indeed, the wrong choice. By the time I realised the pack of grouse were on me and I attempted to raise my gun to my shoulder and single out a target, they effortlessly zoomed over my head like tiny F-16 fighter jets and were already 50 yards down the moor by the time I turned around and got my first shot off. It’s at times like these when you can see why the lightweight side by side was made and how this fast handling, super lively gun is really in a class of its own.

I did take some lovely long crossers with my gun but on a truly wild moor, when you may have only 20 yards vision in front of you and the grouse are coming straight down your throat, as they should do, with the speed that you are able to mount the gun and connect with your target, the lightweight side by side will always reign supreme, it’s also a faster gun to exchange with your loader and for him to reload. I’m sure I would have taken many more birds out front than I did with my own gun, which of course is the true skill of grouse shooting. Even if grouse shooting is not your game, these guns fit perfectly for proper classic partridge shooting with hedge hopping coveys that flare over the line of guns, or are equally at home with walked up woodcock or quail hunting where speed is of the essence. Instinctive, quick mounting, snap shooting is often the most rewarding, and I would say, the purest form of shotgun shooting.

This fine pair of lightweight guns were built for a local family and have spent their entire life no more than 12 miles from the factory where they were made. The first gun was built in 1948 and was sold through our Bennetts Hill, Birmingham shop. Built on a scroll back action with our patent hand detachable locks, two triggers and all the usual WR features it remain in superb original condition. The 28” barrels have 2 ½” chambers and are choked ¼ in the right and full in the left. The highly figured stock measures 13 ¾” to the centre of the horn heel plate and is cast off for the right shoulder. The gun weighs 6lbs ½oz and is cased in the original case with our Bennetts Hill stamp.

Top: 1st gun Bottom: 2nd gun

Top: 1st gun Bottom: 2nd gun

The second gun was completed in 1965 as a 21st birthday present for the current owner. The action and barrels were made to match the first gun, only the stock length is longer at 14 7/8” which makes this gun a few ounces heavier at 6lbs 3oz. Both guns have the same classic Westley scroll engraving with game birds on the trigger guards and equally retain some vivid case colours. The ribs are engraved ‘WESTLEY RICHARDS 23 CONDUIT STREET LONDON. GUNMAKERS BY APPOINTMENT TO THE LATE KING GEORGE V’. Rather than gold numbered 1 & 2, in order to instantly tell them apart, the second gun has a three point gold star on the lever, rib and Deeley catch to match the owner’s Mercedes badge!

Top: 1st gun Bottom: 2nd gun

Top: 1st gun Bottom: 2nd gun

Right: 1st gun Left: 2nd gun

Both guns really are in fantastic condition for their age it’s testament to the current owner’s care and attention these guns have had. The guns are well in proof and have excellent wall thickness with plenty of life left in the barrels. The stocks have the usual handling marks but they are free from any structural damage. The time has come for the guns to find new homes and they can bought as a pair or split as they are cased individually and have different measurements. They would really make a great father and son pair of guns as they were built to be. They will be on the used gun site shortly but for any initial enquires please email me at ricky@westleyrichards.co.uk

Fine B. Halliday & Co. .470 Boxlock Double Rifle

The latest pre-owned rifle to land at WR UK is this fine .470 boxlock ejector double rifle by retailer, B. Halliday & Co. Ltd. Not a gunmaker in their own right, they had guns and rifles made for them in the Birmingham trade and were then retailed through their 63 Cannon Street, London address. Records for Halliday are hard to come by and it is thought they have either been lost or were destroyed during WW2. It is believed that Halliday was employed by W J Jeffery & Co. but then left to start his own business in 1921 at 60 Queen Victoria Street and in 1925, moved to 63 Cannon Street. Cannon street is located in the City of London itself, centrally located between St Pauls Cathedral, the Bank of England and the Tower of London.

The rifle is built on an Anson & Deeley, fixed lock, double trigger action with Tigers and Indian Elephant scenes engraving with a nicely executed scroll surround. The game scenes are typically naive, a common feature on guns from the interwar period destined for the Indian market.

The 26” barrels have tidy bores and the rifle shoots a very respectable group (see target below). They feature a file cut quarter rib with Dolls Head Extension. A rear express sight with one standing and two folding leaves regulated at 100, 200 & 300 yards and a single bead ramp foresight.  The target was shot at 50 yards using Hornady 500 grain soft nosed ammunition and was shot with a 6 o’clock hold due to the rifle being regulated at 100 yards. The pistol grip stock measures 14 ¼” to the centre of the traditional recoil pad with an extended tang, grip cap and silver stock. The splinter forend features the Anson push rod release.

The rifle weighs 10lbs 9.5oz and is neatly presented in an oak and leather case with cleaning rods, snap caps, oil bottle and leather sling. The case would appear to be a later addition and features trade labels from London Guns of Victoria, Australia. The rifle was acquired by Walter Clode from India via Australia sometime in the 1980’s, during the height of Mr. Clode’s used gun dealings. It was sold to a local hunter by Mr. Clode in May 1987 and in the last 32 years has hunted on 3 different continents and has been a much trusted companion on a wide variety of hunts in East Africa, Canada and has even been back ‘home’ to Australia’s Northern Territory.

It really is a super rifle with a good deal of character. It remains in original condition and would have a had a light refurbishment by Mr. Clode in the 80’s. There are the usual handling marks on the stock as you’d expect but the stock is sound and the rifle functions perfectly. This rifle is ready and waiting for its next safari and offers someone a fantastic opportunity to acquire themselves a great English double, in one of the most popular big game calibres ever made.

The time has now come for Westley Richards to once again find a home for this great rifle and it will be on our used gun site shortly. Please contact me for any enquiries; ricky@westleyrichards.co.uk

A Rare Westley Richards .22 LR ‘Best Quality’ Bolt Action Rifle

In all my years selling guns, I don’t think I ever met anyone who didn’t have a .22 LR of some kind. Probably one of the greatest cartridges ever invented, it can be used as a precision target round or a highly effective hunting tool. It is very inexpensive to produce and good reliable firearms, in both handguns and rifles, can be made and sold at very reasonable prices. Not surprisingly, the cartridge is one of the most widely used in the World and I would imagine most readers of this blog have at least one rifle chambered for the .22 Long Rifle.

The American firm J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. first introduced the .22 Long Rifle (.22 LR) in 1847. It has a rimfire case (based on Louis-Nicolas Flobert’s .22 BB Cap cartridge) and shoots a 0.22” calibre 40 grain bullet at around 1,200 fps producing virtually no recoil. Being cheap, plentiful and easy to shoot, the cartridge also makes a wonderful round for teaching and practicing the fundamentals of shooting.

Due to the popularity of the cartridge, the rifles and handguns chambered for the .22 LR must be in the tens of millions. British companies such as BSA certainly contributed their fair share and even the best gun and rifle makers of England offered rifles chambered in .22 LR. I have seen .22 rifles from makers James Woodward, James Purdey, Holland & Holland, William Evans, and of course, Westley Richards. Most were single shot rook and rabbit rifles, but I have also encountered more than one Best Quality double rifle chambered for the cartridge. However, as popular as the .22 LR is, it is more often associated with a child’s gun or small game hunting. Finding any kind of .22 rifle made to the standard of a best quality big bore rifle, is something that will rarely happen.

You can imagine my surprise when I first heard of the rifle that just came through the U.S. Agency. Made in 1983 to match a customer’s big bore Westley Richards, the rifle pictured here is the only best quailty .22 LR bolt action rifle Westley Richards has ever made.

The history is fuzzy on how this rifle actually came to be but, the story goes, it started out to provide the client with a rifle to practice his shooting, in a chambering more economical and fun to shoot than his big bore rifle, yet having a similar style of sights, size and weight. The current owner had told me about this rifle but seeing it in person, it was clear this project took on a life of its own becoming much more than just a rifle to practice with.

The rifle is best quality in every way. Based on an action of Mauser design, the MAS .22 LR Training Rifle. After WWII, the Mauser factory fell into French controlled territory and during this time, the French had the factory design a .22 calibre training rifle for their military. The Mauser people drew on a previous Mauser 22 design, the KKW, and made some slight modifications. The first ones were produced in the Mauser factory but, production was moved to Manufacture d’armes de Saint-Étienne (MAS) or the Saint-Étienne Arms Manufacturer. MAS was a French state-owned manufacturing company located in the town of Saint-Étienne, where weapons have been manufactured since the Middle Ages. The rifles were assembled until the existing supply of parts were used up.

The metal is engraved in a full coverage ‘House’ pattern scroll common to Westley Richards bolt action rifles from the 1980’s. The rifle is fitted with a highly figured, full-size walnut stock complete with raised beaded cheekpiece, full pistol grip, a very fine point pattern wrap checkering and the traditional horn butt plate, pistol grip cap and forend tip. The rifle also features full size one-piece bottom metal with an inside-the-bow release straddle floor plate. The floor plate opens and reveals the 5-round detachable magazine the MAS 45 rifles were originally fitted with.

For the original MAS 45 magazines to work, the gunmakers hid the magazine under the floor plate and milled a magazine box, from a solid steel billet, to accept the magazine. This allowed the original magazines to work in a standard center fire rifle stock that is far deeper than the original training rifles.

The rifle has a 24” barrel with the same contour as a standard centerfire rifle and the muzzle’s crown is recessed ¼” with a diameter of about .330”, hiding the small .22 calibre bore and further adding to the rifle’s disguise. The barrel was also fitted with Westley Richards pattern island rear sight with one standing Express sight and three folding leaves (50, 75, 100, 150 yds) and Westley Richards patent combination foresight. The rifle was also made to accept a scope and has handmade grooved mounts that replace the original receiver sight the MAS 45 rifles were fitted with. The bases are engraved to match the rest of the rifle and accept American scope rings intended for .22 rifles with ¾” grooved receivers.

As with any best quality gun or rifle, the devil is always in the details. This rifle is certainly not short on any details. I also imagine the rifle comes with plenty of heartache, frustration and disdain from the men who had to make it. While it is hard enough to build a gun or rifle to best quality standards on a model of gun the makers are familiar with, applying that same standard to something the makers have never built brings a new host of challenges to its manufacture. Being that the factory had never made a .22 bolt action before, there were no plans, notes or examples to reverse engineer, so the project started with a blank sheet of paper. Add all of this with an overarching theme to deceive the viewer into thinking it is a larger calibre rifle than it is, I can only imagine the turmoil this little rifle’s creation caused.

Its rarity notwithstanding, the amount of thought, ingenuity and attention to detail that went into this project is quite astounding and, I guess, that is part of what makes this rifle so alluring.

 

Happy 4th July To All Our Good Friends & Customers In The USA.

Happy Independence Day to all our good friends and customers there in the USA. 243 years ago you pushed through your own version of Brexit with a lot more success than we seem to be achieving today!

As a company well supported by the USA we thought it only proper to post a good old piece of American gun history with a little English twist. Winchester is without doubt one of the most iconic rifle names in the world and so it was just this weekend that we persuaded a gun collecting friend of ours to lend us this little gem of a rifle.

This Model ’95 lever action was the first model offered with a box magazine by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company and as such allowed for the use of pointed bullets in a Winchester rifle. The design was made famous by Theodore Roosevelt who used one in .405 Winchester calibre on his epic safari of 1909 an account of which is detailed in his subsequent book African Game Trails.

Previous Winchester models had the famous tubular magazine which due to the in-line nature of the cartridge in the magazine, meant that for safety reasons only blunt nosed bullets could be utilised. The Model ’95 changed all that.

This particular rifle is chambered in that great American cartridge the .30-06 Springfield, to this day one of the finest cartridges around. The rifle was offered in this calibre from 1908 to 1926. The rifle features the interrupted thread take-down system and is unbelievably quick and easy to assemble.

Retailed through the London Armoury Company Limited, London, the rifle comes in a very typical English format canvas and leather trim case. Even to the trained eye you would be forgiven for thinking that this case held a small bore shotgun or some other weapon of British origin. The fact it holds a wonderful Winchester take-down rifle is all the more surprising and in truth pleasing.

Enjoy the rest of your holiday!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Westley Richards ‘The Explora’ Journal – In From The Printers!!!!

Hot off the press and looking magnificent is The Explora journal by Westley Richards. This last week we received the first 10 copies for approval and we all have to say that it surpasses even our demanding standards!

Having taken 2 1/2 years to bring to fruition it was with great excitement, trepidation and relief that we got to handle the first copies fresh in from the printers. This project was a true labor of love for the team here at Westley Richards, so it was finally great to see the fruits of all that hard work.

The front cover features Westley Richards stunning and as yet unseen ‘Forest Rifle’, a magnificent .600 droplock double rifle specially commissioned to reflect the Central African forest environment. Fully carved in exceptional detail with the flora and fauna of the forest floor, the story of this rifle unfolds in the stunning photography The Explora fans have come to expect from Westley Richards.

Other articles, specially commissioned, focus on engraving, gunmaking, historical weapons, shooting and gun fit, topics we hope will be close to the heart of many an avid sporting man and woman.

Presented in a beautifully-designed luxury format with a combination of high quality uncoated and gloss coated paper stock and an outer cover finished with a scratch resistant matt lamination with spot gloss varnish and gold foil embossed logo. The 180-page journal, epitomises the exceptional standards and painstaking attention to detail synonymous with Westley Richards.

With a limited print run of only 1000 copies, never to be re-printed, The Explora journal is set to become a collectors item that no self respecting Westley Richards afficiando should be without.

The first copies to clients will be coming out in the next few weeks so for those of you yet to place your order now is the time!!!!!

To order your copy of The Explora journal click here

Or

Telephone:  UK 0121 333 1900   USA +1 850 677 3688

Email: retail@westleyrichards.co.uk

 

 

 

A Small Westley Richards Find

Every now and then one of those nice little finds gets passed our way here at Westley Richards. And so it is that this 10 round .22 rimfire stock magazine came our way recently and has been added to the archive here at the factory.

Discovered in the back of an old shop as literally ‘dead stock’ it must have been there from before the First World War and once again highlights that you never know what might be lurking, tucked away in some dark corner. One day I hope to find that elusive Westley Richards howdah pistol, complete with case and accessories in pristine unfired condition…………..

Rigby Refurbishment

Although repairs and refurbishments have always been a part of the Westley Richards repertoire, in recent years, following record numbers of new gun and rifle orders, we have sadly had to reduce the amount we take on. Repairs can be disruptive to the steady flow of new gun manufacture and often, on vintage guns of various makes, can be time consuming when machining and fitting new parts. Even the small amount we now do results in our production manager pulling his hair out trying to work out quite how he’s going to fit it in his extremely busy new gun and rifle schedule and without wishing the poor chap to be bald before his time, we have to be selective on what we take in. On the odd occasion I do manage to sneak a few into the workshops and one such rifle we have recently completed is this superb Rigby .450 Nitro Express Farquharson rifle. I thought the readers of the Explora would enjoy a few before and after photos of this stunning rifle.

In summary, our initial task was to re-regulate the sight work and sort the issue of faulty extraction. The rifle was shooting high and struggling to extract the spent cartridge. Once the rifle was back into working order it could be stripped down and we could then begin the cosmetic works. The wood work was put into the stock finishing shop and the many coats of oil were carefully applied to build the finish up to our normal best quality, high gloss finish. The action was annealed and we then recut and picked up all the engraving, bringing back to life the elaborate scroll work, Rigby name, double line border and sight work. Any pins that were tired or chewed were replaced and engraved. Once done it could be polished and prepped for hardening. The barrel was then polished and best quality re-blacked, topped and tailed, ready to be reassembled. The action, lever, safety button, grip cap and forend diamond were re-colour hardened, the trigger and pins were blued, sight worked and sling stud were blacked. The rifle was then freed up and fully reassembled before the final checks and finishing coats of oil on the stock were applied, ready for final inspection.

I think you’ll agree the rifle has turned out quite superbly and we are proud to have restored this wonderful rifle back to its former glory.